Archive for the great vehicle

RECORDING | The Great Vehicle – Observatory Sermons

Posted in recordings with tags , on December 4, 2016 by dukewisdom
The Great Vehicle - Observatory Sermons

The Great Vehicle – Observatory Sermons

Please have a listen or download this progressive rock EP at bandcamp.

The Great Vehicle | Observatory Sermons
A Space Operetta in Six Stanzas

[[Each of the scenarios described below is taking place simultaneously. Right now and always.]]

001 The Man With the Neutron Scalp

[[Neutrons carry no electrical charge; their behavior is essential to the production of nuclear power. Yuri Gagarin, the star of this song, said, “The road to the stars is steep and dangerous. (Spaceflight) isn’t the work of one man or even a group of men. It is a historical process which mankind is carrying out in accordance with the natural laws of human development.” As he was hurled through space, Gagarin was an analogy: As neutral, yet powerful as a subatomic particle.]]

This song nearly refused to exist. Each time “Neutron” was exported—even by them most ballin’ computer we had access to—the mix became haunted by inconsistent glitches and other weirdness. (The machine was anything but “working normally.”) The finished product is the result of several subatomic edits. Embedded in this track is the explosive sound of a door slamming shut in the stairwell of a Virginia Beach Sheraton. We know you people love the field recordings. Internal notes about this song make reference to “the Prong section” and “the Queens of the Stone Age riff.” Please try to identify these sections in the interest of mental dexterity.

002 Lazlo Szombathy

[[Lazlo Szombathy is a peripheral character in the Kurt Vonnegut novel Mother Night, whose inclusion was a nod to the interconnectedness of all actions. Watch what you’re doing: We are all peripheral characters in the Novel of the Galaxy.]]

Wherein Betse Ellis makes the Kansas and Mahavishnu Orchestra dreams of those who have such things come true. That’s the main melody there in the acoustic intro, reharmonized a fifth lower. We know you people love reharmonization. The melody at 1:54 originated as sort of a guitar placeholder, then took on a most macabre flavor when doubled by Betse. The song is in 7/8, but contains exactly one measure of 8/8. Can you spot it? Do you care?

003 Did I See You Limping?

[[Things can get a little perilous down around the gantry. In fact, near Baikonur Cosmodrome, cases of “launchpad lameness” (стартовая площадка хромота) were once so common that it was easy to identify a certain grade of worker based on his gait.]]

The main riff may be considered 11/4 or 6/4 + 5/4. Or perhaps you will not consider it at all. For more counting, the section at 1:27 has 5/8 and 8/8 going on over drums in 5/4. Let’s boogie. Additional nuts & bolts: Note how the harmony guitars that enter at 3:24 foretell the drum pattern at 3:29.

004 Sundials

[[So long as a planet rotates on its axis, sundials operate the same regardless of the star supplying the light. The sundials in question happen to be on EPIC 201637175b, an exoplanet orbiting the red dwarf K2-22. This destination is 734 light years from Earth, but due to the nature of this story, listeners there are currently receiving.]]

This piece has undergone many revisions of arrangement, concept, and title. It started as a memorial to a departed friend, then took on more meaning and dedications as more friends departed. Enough with that bullshit, people. This is our first song to feature a ship’s bell. (We know how you people … oh, forget it.)

005 The People’s Cathedral

[[By its strictest definition, a cathedral is a very specific religious edifice. In the scope of the Observatory Sermons legend, a cathedral is any space in which the Invocation of the Bald Chemist is being observed. This may include a frozen warehouse, near a tree, or aboard the Chinese Shenzhou 5 reentry capsule.]]

It’s the title track to a different release … you know, like “Sheer Heart Attack” or “Houses of the Holy.” For those interested in the schematic, “Cathedral” is built around a fairly simple 6/4 over 4/4 polyrhythm. Just don’t try to listen to the opposite part when you’re playing along. Also, the bass and guitar are playing the same repeating pattern, but offset by three notes.

006 Pioneer 11

[[NASA ceased communicating with the exploratory spacecraft Pioneer 11 on September 30, 1995. But it’s still out there, a ghost ship heading toward Lambda Aquila, a star it will encounter in about four million years. Hitch a ride on that great vehicle.]]

“Pioneer” is The Great Vehicle’s longest, most spacious piece. The guitars are tuned, low-to-high, DADFCE, or what you might think of as open Dm9. Y’know, if you wish to do a cover.
The free-form middle section was harvested from the defunct Great Vehicle song “23/24 of Something.” It was conceived as a cross between musique concrète and a Calder mobile, and may or may not accidentally owe something to “Cygnus X-1” by Rush (probably don’t mention that to Gregg) or possibly “The Grand Vizier’s Garden Party” by Pink Floyd (definitely don’t mention that to Gregg).


The players:
Mason Fann – Bass, fractional wave mutilation
Gregg Todt – Drums, percussion, baritone strangulation
Troy Van Horn – Guitar, percussion

Also featuring:
Betse Ellis – Violin (or is it Fiddle?)
The Tuvan Learning Center Annex Singers – Singing

Produced by The Great Vehicle
Recorded at #Industries
Basic tracks engineered by Paul Marchman
Additional recording at The Prussian Film Commission

Thanks to:
Paul Marchman, Betse Ellis, Joey “Boatswain” Hamm, Jason Brown, Mike “Whoof” Stover, Rex Woodwind, Robert Crypt, the late Cozy Powell’s leather gauntlets, North Tunnel Whitespace Math

Cover art: Some unsigned thrift store painting that hangs in Troy’s house.

Gear geek data:

Guitar sounds:
1974 Fender Stratocaster, 2006 Gibson Les Paul Studio, ’00s Michael Kelly Patriot Hot Rod, 1982 Gibson Marauder, ’70s Opus XX acoustic, 2005 Gibson SG Standard, FrankenBaritone (Fender Jaguar body with Danelectro neck), Peavey Power Slide (all strings tuned to A), Scarlett custom 50 watt guitar head, Marshall 4×12 cabinet, ’70s Fender Pro Reverb, 2005 Vox AC30, slide … Craftsman 11/16 socket

Bass sounds:
1974 Fender Jazz Bass modified with DiMarzio P-bass pickup in neck, original J’s in humbucker configuration in bridge with series/parallel switching (custom candy apple red finish ,once owned by member of The Commodores … for extra fucking vibes), 1995 American Fender P-Bass with custom wound Scarlett pickup in tobacco burst finish, Clayton Acetal standard 1.00mm picks (clear), 1972 Ampeg B15S, Scarlett 200 watt White Knight head into fearFul designed DIY 15/6 + fearFul designed DIY 15.

Bass pedal chain: Boss TU-2>Joyo Ultimate Overdrive> Boss LS-2 (A loop) EHX MicroPog>1972 EHX Big Muff fuzz>Boss PS-3>Dunlop 105Q bass wah>Boss RV-3> (A output) -> Ampeg (B output) Dunlop TS-1 tremolo>Akai Headrush E2 ->Scarlett

Drum sounds:
Ludwig Green Sparkle John Bonham kit – 26 x 14″ kick drum, 14 x 10″ rack tom and 16 x 16″ and 18 x 16″ floor toms, Yamaha Tour Custom snare 14 x 8″, whatever cymbals were laying around not broken, Blue Rhino propane tank (empty) (we suppose).

Additional:
Bebot Theremin App played on iPhone6S through Scarlett head
credits
released October 14, 2016

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RECORDING | The Great Vehicle – The People’s Cathedral of Wavelengths

Posted in recordings with tags , on August 1, 2013 by dukewisdom
The Great Vehicle - The People's Cathedral of Wavelengths

The Great Vehicle – The People’s Cathedral of Wavelengths

This was the first (somewhat) proper recording of The Great Vehicle, a group started in the summer of 2011. This release is available at Bandcamp where the following “liner notes” lay it out pretty well:

The Great Vehicle – The People’s Cathedral of Wavelengths: A guided tour of performance, technical, and philosophical minutiae.

For your dancing and listening enhancement.

Bald Chemist
The People’s Cathedral of Wavelengths starts off, as so many great EPs do, with a quick reference to the Squeeze album Frank. And then we get down to business. It’s the business of pondering, what if Andy Summers accompanied Michael Karoli to a thrift store, what if Terry Kath had been born in Istanbul, what if you could overdub today’s version of yourself into last June, and who gives a fuck anyway? You too can ruminate on these and other closely related matters as the dense cube of sound hovers millimeters above your cranium.

By the way, the basic tracks for all of these songs were recorded using the following gear:

• 1974 Fender Stratocaster through a custom Scarlett Amplification 50 watt head and a Celestion-loaded Randall 4×12 cabinet with the logo removed and a bad caster. Additional flavoring and hiss from Boss, Danelectro, and MXR pedals.
• 1995 Fender American Standard Precision Bass through a custom Scarlett Amplification 200 watt head and handmade EV 15B-loaded TL606 cabinets. Additional tonal squeezing from Ibanez TS-9, GGG Tuned Big Muff Pi clone, and early 70’s Big Muff pedals.
• A recording-specific drum set comprising 10”x14” and 16”x16” Ludwig toms (green sparkle), a Pearl 16”x22” kick drum (black) and a 1980s Yamaha Stage Series snare featuring an Evans ST Dry head that’s been on for at least 12 years. Cymbals used: Whatever Gregg had lying around in an old Minsky’s Pizza bag that weren’t cracked.

The “Bald Chemist” guitar solo was performed on a burgundy ‘00s Gibson Les Paul Studio with a mirrored pick guard. That’s where it gets its tone. And if you think the reverb on the snare at 2:05 is reminiscent of that in Van Halen’s “Love Walks In,” well, that’s an unfortunate coincidence. The end of the song features a fan favorite sing-along. Actually, it’s amusing (for about 17 seconds) to shout “Bald Chemist” at the end of any song … by any band, really.

Black Mesh Object
The bass guitar riff from “Black Mesh Object” randomly fell out of Mason’s hands at a rehearsal and Troy wrote out the 7/8 middle section while stopped at a traffic light. This is how you write a song. And speaking of that middle section, it also features sleigh bells played in a way they’re not supposed to be played and a 10” rack tom run through an amp emulator for maximum Mitchell Froom-ian say what-ness.

The Gift of Weird Horse Bones
Music to dig a moat by. “The Gift of Weird Horse Bones” was the first song written for The Great Vehicle, the riff appearing in Troy’s head before there really was any manner of vehicle. Things to consider: The Brian May type harmonies that pop up were a studio embellishment. No astrophysics degree required, thank you. That part that might remind you of something David Gilmour played on Pink Floyd’s “Pigs” is derived from the whole tone scale. Also, the gallop-y middle section (referred to colloquially as the “Iron Maiden part,” though Erik thought it sounded like “Smokin’” by Boston) used to be another long-winded guitar solo before it became composed carnival ride music. Time signatures utilized: 3/4, 4/4, 5/4 for those transcribing at home.

Phosphorus
This solo guitar piece was performed on a Di Pinto guitar (silver sparkle) tuned to an open augmented chord (F A C# F A F, it is believed). The tone was achieved by running directly into a Roland VS-880 Digital Studio Workstation and using its internal amp modeling presets. The results were just fine. And then Erik mentioned in passing a field recording he’d made in Australia of bellbirds (Manorina melanophrys). That’s what you hear in the background and that’s what made this piece come to life, such a life as it has.

Touched in the Head
A hot jam for your Ganymedian dance party, “Touched in the Head” is sometimes referred to as “Phil Rudd Counts to Five.” The first riff has been around since about 2006 and the “verse” chords are derived from an aborted song called “No Ape Chains.” So, yeah, it’s basically disparate mismatched junk glued together with industrial strength adhesive—in the best possible way, of course. Watching Gregg play the drum parts to this song is even better than listening to them. But you’ll have to see that for yourself.

Swan Meat (Slight Reduction)
If Nokie Edwards from The Ventures listened to Prong for three years solid he might … no, never mind. At any rate, “Swan Meat” is TGV’s version of garage-prog-surf. Deep info about the track: It has the diminished scale in its DNA (for those transcribing at home). The guitar solo was performed on a Michael Kelly Valor-Q with direct-mounted, zebra-coil Rockfield SCW humbuckers. And those Racer X sort of harmony arpeggios required fewer takes than you might think. (There was an over/under of 7,000 going into the session.) The breakdown following the solo features an unknown preacher from an unknown cable channel (we’re not saying anyway) and percussive whacking on a flask (empty).