WORMHOLE GUITAR | Binary Arpeggios

Example 1: Am | E

Example 1: Am | E

Example 2: Am | Ebm

Example 2: Am | Ebm

Example 3: Am | Bm

Example 3: Am | Bm

What about it?

A “binary arpeggio,” as I’m calling it, is a pattern created by interweaving the tones of two complimentary or opposing chords. The first note of the sequence belongs to the primary chord, the second note to the secondary chord, and so on. The concept is simple, but there are multiple ways to realize such frameworks. In Examples 1 and 2 the facing chords are represented by toggling between their root notes, then thirds and fifths. Example 3, on the other hand, shuffles the chord tones into a more complex root¹- fifth², root² – fifth³, third¹ – third² distribution. Note also that the chords which are paired may be diatonically related as in Example 1 (A minor) and Example 3 (F major) or harmonically at odds as in Example 2.

Why bother?

As with previous Wormhole Guitar material like Compound Arpeggios No. 1, the binary shapes provide unusual fingerings which makes them valuable as exercises. Run these patterns on loop to a metronome observing the picking notations and watch your technique develop. But of course the more important function of the concept is to spark creativity. Stuck in a writing rut? Do your new riffs sound like third-rate Jimmy Page? Try to intertwine some logically connected or wildly disparate chords and marvel at the unique sounds.
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